Edinburgh Festival Fringe

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the world’s largest festival of arts and culture. For three weeks in August, the city of Edinburgh is flooded with creative energy from all over the world. Artists and entertainers flock to hundreds of city stages to provide concerts for every taste. The festival caters to everyone, from great names in the entertainment industry to undiscovered artists trying to improve their careers, and includes theatre, comedy, dance, physical theatre, circus, cabaret, children’s performances, musicals, opera, music, spoken word, exhibits, and events. The Edinburgh Festival Fringe (also known as The Fringe, Edinburgh Fringe, or Edinburgh Fringe Festival) is the world’s largest arts festival, lasting 25 days and showcasing over 55,000 performances of 3,548 distinct shows in 317 venues in 2018. It was founded in 1947 as an alternative to the Edinburgh International Festival and is held in August in Edinburgh. In terms of worldwide ticketed events, the Edinburgh Festival Fringe has become a world-leading festival of arts and culture, only surpassed by the Olympics and the World Cup. According to its history and previous chairman of the board, Michael Dale, the event “has done more to establish Edinburgh in the forefront of world cities than anything else.”

The Fringe has become more structured since its inception, while it still rejects the invitation-only concept. In 1959, the Fringe Society was created to organise the burgeoning festival. Performers and theatre organisations who register with the Fringe Society are mentioned in an official schedule and have the option to sell tickets through the central box office. Unregistered participants are still welcome, and anybody with a venue is invited to put on a show. As a result of this policy, a wide range of acts, including children’s shows, comedy, dance, opera, musicals, dramas, acrobatic displays, workshops, and buskers, are offered.

When does the Fringe begin and end?

The next Fringe will be held from August 5 to August 29, 2022, marking the festival’s 75th anniversary. The Fringe has become more structured since its inception, while it still rejects the invitation-only concept. In 1959, the Fringe Society was created to organise the burgeoning festival. Performers and theatre organisations who register with the Fringe Society are mentioned in an official schedule and have the option to sell tickets through the central box office. Unregistered participants are still welcome, and anybody with a venue is invited to put on a show. As a result of this policy, a wide range of acts, including children’s shows, comedy, dance, opera, musicals, dramas, acrobatic displays, workshops, and buskers, are offered.